CLRC Asks the Candidates — Urban Renewal, Condos, Emergency Care, Ballot Measures


by John Kiljan

Dear CLRC members and friends,

Find out where our Colorado legislative candidates stand on local issues.

Once again, it is election time. At the end of last week, the CLRC sent out campaign questionnaires to 14 local candidates running for seats in the Colorado General Assembly. We asked about the candidates’ positions on pending legislation that directly affects the neighborhoods in central Arvada. The questions were suggested by the CLRC’s 15-member steering committee during the course of the month and compiled by the Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community’s president, T.O. Owens, last week.

Ballot Blue Book 2014

Ballot Blue Book 2014

In the past, the CLRC has put campaign questions to candidates for the Arvada City Council (including the recent District 1 vacancy), the boards of directors for Apex Park and Recreation and the Arvada Fire Protection District. But two years ago the CLRC didn’t ask any questions to those running for seats in the State Legislature. We simply didn’t see a need.

But a lot has changed in two years: A bill was introduced to close down the new emergency room on Ralston road. Developers are now planning to build about a thousand new apartments locally — none of which will be owner-occupied. And a bill was passed (and then vetoed by the Governor) that would limit cities ability to clean up urban blight in areas like the Triangle.

These are all local issues that the legislature will deal with in the coming year. Add to that several statewide issues that our members are interested in, and we thought it was time to ask the candidates a few questions on where they stood on these issues. Plus, we probably won’t get a chance to annoy our representatives in General Assembly with pointed questions like this for another two years.   8^)

The CLRC lies in Senate District 19 and in House Districts 27 and 29. We expanded the list of candidates to include Wheat Ridge’s Senate District 20 and House District 24, both located just south of the Arvada City limits. We did that because two of those candidates will still get to vote on what affects neighboring Arvada. But also because many of our members and friends live outside of the CLRC’s primary area of interest — which is roughly the neighborhoods located within a half a mile of Ralston Road from Kipling to the Wadsworth Bypass.

VoteminiThe response deadline for our candidate surveys is just before the mail-in ballots arrive and we hope to post the results on the week of October 12th. So if you are unsure on how you will vote on any candidate or issue, you may want to wait until we put up the responses. You can drop your ballot off at the post office or save a stamp and use the ballot box at City Hall.

Copied here is the two-page candidate survey and questionnaire we sent out. The CLRC is a non-partisan association and we do not endorse candidates for elected office. However, we do encourage our members and friends to become informed about the candidates’ positions and to actively support any candidate they want to see elected.

* * *

CLRC 2014 Candidate Survey and Questionnaire

Survey Background

1) In 2014, legislation (SB 16) was introduced that would have caused Arvada’s only emergency room, First Choice, located in the Arvada Triangle, to close down. This was the first prominent business to open for years in this run-down shopping center. The bill died in the Senate, after a community forum held in March by the CLRC, but it is likely to come up again next year.

2) One more attempt to fix the Colorado construction defect laws was stopped in the Senate during the last legislative session. The laws currently on the books effectively prevent developers from getting the financing they need to build owner-occupied apartments (condos) in Arvada and throughout Colorado.

Central Arvada has a housing shortage. Because of the laws now on the books, only for-rent apartments will be built in the 150+ unit Park Place Olde Town development, in the 350+ unit Triangle development proposed for 2016, in the 350+ unit Solana development starting on Grandview just east of the Wadsworth Bypass, and in a new 300 to 400 unit development planned for Ridge Road near the community college west of Kipling.

The annual resident turnover rate for rental apartments is expected to be about 60% per year. Many feel that building only rental apartments is not good for the area’s growth with so much construction that could otherwise be built as owner-occupied condominiums.

3) In legislation that passed during the last minutes of the 2014 session (HB 1375), the increased tax increment generated by the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority for eliminating urban blight was instead be redirected to Jefferson County to be used for other purposes. That last-minute legislation was vetoed by the Governor but is certain to be reintroduced during the 2015 session.

4) There are several other non-neighborhood-specific issues that the members of our steering committee are concerned with. Those include increasing the restrictions on public-private partnership for building large infrastructure projects such as new highways or highway lanes. Also included in the members issues list are several items scheduled to be on the November ballot including

Constitutional Amendment 67 — which newly defines “personhood” and “child” in the Colorado criminal code and [in] the Colorado wrongful death act to include unborn human beings.

Constitutional Amendment 68 — which increases taxes at horse racetracks in three counties and uses those revenues to fund K-12 school districts across the state.

Proposition 104 — which is a petition to change State statutes to require collective bargaining discussions in school districts to be open to the public.

Proposition 105 — which is a petition to require certain foods sold in Colorado to be labeled, “Produced With Genetic Engineering”.

Candidate Questionnaire

1) If elected, will you support re-introduced legislation that causes the First Choice emergency room located in the Arvada Triangle at Independence Street and Ralston Road to go out of business as a stand-alone emergency room?

2) If elected, will you propose (or support) legislation to amend the existing construction defect laws to make it advantageous for developers to build owner-occupied condominiums instead of for-rent apartments?

3) If elected, will you support a resurrected House Bill 1375 to redirect new tax revenues generated by Arvada’s urban renewal authority to Jefferson County instead of being used for eliminating urban blight within the City of Arvada?

4) Please use this opportunity to let us know your views on any other issues you want to comment on, including, but not limited to, a) restrictions on public-private partnerships for large infrastructure projects, b) Amendment 67, unborn human beings, c) Amendment 68, using racetracks to fund schools, d) Proposition 104, open labor negotiations in school districts, e) Proposition 105, labeling of genetically engineered foods.

 

Please use additional pages as necessary, and be sure to respond by October 9, 2014

* * *

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Monday 29 September 2014

 

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Changes Proposed for Arvada Center


by John Kiljan

Dear CLRC members and friends,

The City Council will be reviewing the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities governance documents at a Monday evening workshop.  However, the documents did not get distributed to the Council on Friday as expected and they are not in the Council packet available to the public online. Those who are interested can get copies emailed to them from City Hall (from the Clerk’s office) on Monday morning, September 22.  However, there is a lot of material to go through before Monday evening.

ArvCentNightBut there is no need to wait.  If any reader wants them now, just drop me an email and I’ll forward on my set of five documents. Be sure to use the jpkiljan@yahoo.com email address and put the words “Arvada Center” in the email title so I don’t overlook it.

This is a workshop, and there will be no public comment period on Monday night. But you can still pass your thoughts onto the Council members and City Staff before then.

Several amendments to the operating agreement are being proposed — either for now or for later. Without commenting on their merits, here are some of them:

o Eliminate the wording that says, “Further, the purpose of The Arvada Council for the Arts and Humanities, Inc [to be the new Arvada Center Foundation] are to promote, solicit and encourage the historical, art, musical and dramatic functions of the City of Arvada.”
o Eliminate membership provisions and voting control of City Council
o Eliminate provisions requiring distribution of assets to City of Arvada on dissolution
o Amend purposes provisions to eliminate advisory role of charity to City and to provide for active management role
o Review and modify standing committees (currently executive committee and finance committee only)
o Eliminate requirement that board of directors’ meetings comply with Colorado open meetings statute
o Eliminate references to adherence to policies of the City of Arvada regarding conflicts of interest and standards of conduct

CropDPArvadaCenterPhoto

 

The CLRC has several past articles related to turning the operation of the Arvada Center over to a private non-profit foundation on our RalstonCommunity.org website. Just enter the words “Arvada Center” into the site’s search line.

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Saturday 20 September 2014

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The Homeless in Arvada — Camping in Olde Town


by John Kiljan

What do you do when an unkempt lady with a baby comes up to your car in the Triangle shopping district and says she’s just been evicted from her friend’s apartment and needs money to find a place to stay for the night? Even if you gave her enough cash for a cheap motel in nearby Wheat Ridge and food for the baby, she’d still have the same problem the following night.   And you don’t really know if she was really tossed out of the home she was “couch surfing” at or if she is just out panhandling for some extra spending money for beer or wine.

APD "Who Can Help" brochure

APD “Who Can Help” brochure

The Arvada Police Department has at least part of the answer to that question with a brochure they distribute to the homeless people they encounter. Their “Those Who Can Help” flyer lists the names and numbers of the various agencies available to Arvada citizens who are homeless and who do indeed need help. You can print out a few copies yourself to hand out to those you find are in need by going to this web page,

http://arvadapd.org/pages/arvada-police-create-homeless-resource-guide-public-service-annoucement

and clicking on the “Homeless Brochure” link you’ll find at the bottom of the website. I keep a few copies of it in my car’s glove box. There is also a link to a two-minute video that explains the City of Arvada’s philosophy toward helping the homeless.

Unlike Denver, the City of Arvada doesn’t have a social services program itself, but instead makes significant contributions to various Arvada and Jefferson County relief agencies that do provide emergency food, clothing and housing relief for the homeless.

Homeless in Arvada's Snake Park

Homeless in Arvada’s Snake Park

An excellent article by Denver Post reporter Austin Briggs in last Thursday’s edition of YourHub describes part of the growing problem of homeless people and sleeping rough in central Arvada. It’s called “Advocates for Homeless in Jefferson County See Need for Day Center”. If you care about your community, it is well worth the few minutes it takes to read it. If you no longer get the print edition of the Post you can probably read the on-line edition of the article for free at this link:

http://www.denverpost.com/arvada/ci_26410103/advocates-homeless-jefferson-county-see-need-day-center

However, the Post has been capping free access to their online content lately and you may have to purchase an online subscription to read the story if you’ve recently read other DP articles. A subscription is well worth it to keep informed about what’s happening your community.

Here are a few quotes from Mr Briggs write up:

“Homeless men without a place to sleep have been known to camp out in the wooded area [aka, Snake Park] near Grandview Avenue and Vance Street. Police frequently have occupants clear the encampments, and the city will soon cut brush and trees along the greenbelt to discourage camping. Next year, an RTD parking garage and eventual development on the site will remove any camping opportunities.”

And why not just arrest those sleeping in public areas and keep hassling them until they move onto some other city?

Homeless_HandoutCropThe article goes on to quote the Arvada Police Department, “Arvada Police Deputy Chief Gary Creager said officers have to strike a balance between enforcing ordinances while not creating a ‘vicious cycle’ of fines, missed court dates, jail, warrants and waste of taxpayer resources.”

“It’s not a crime to be homeless,” Creager said. “They’re citizens of Arvada and we need to respect them like everyone else.”

 

Homelessness is indeed an issue in Arvada.

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
The YourHub article has several links embedded in it that are also worth following.

The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Saturday 30 August 2014

 

 

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Brooks Drive and Garrison Street to be Resurfaced


by John Kiljan

Crews are starting now on some of the last finishing touches to the new Ralston Central Park. As those who live near the area well know, two years of construction traffic have taken its toll on Brooks Drive and on Garrison Street just north of the park, and those two streets were not in the best shape to start with.

Brooks Drive Repair Area Markings

Brooks Drive Repair Area Markings

Originally, Garrison Street and Carr Street were on the resurfacing list for the 2014 paving season to be repaired after the end of park construction. But some areas of Brooks Drive have lately been looking like they are more patches than pavement. The City’s Public Works Department tells me they have decided to hold back on Carr for another season and move now on Brooks Drive because of its condition.

Driver Avoiding Pothole On Garrison St

Driver Avoiding Pothole On Garrison St

Garrison isn’t in much better shape itself. There are only a few nighttime drivers who have not been surprised by some wicked potholes on the street that were only filled with temporary asphalt patching material while utility work was going on.   That recent utility work, running from Ralston Creek to the Oberon Road, is now over.

Restricted Parking on Brooks Drive - click to enlarge

Restricted Parking on Brooks Drive – click to enlarge

Drivers should expect Brooks to be a mess with a lot of heavy equipment parked on it since the more seriously stressed pavement areas are having to be completely excavated and refilled before the actual milling and repaving takes place. It may be best to avoid Brooks from Garrison altogether until the work is done. Fortunately, the highest demand for Brooks Drive has dropped off quite a bit with our schools reopening. There is now more parking space available inside the park itself and fewer people need to park on Brooks Drive.

Other less heavily traveled streets in the Alta Vista and surrounding neighborhoods north of the park are suffering too. These streets are high on the list of needed resurfacing projects set up by the City’s pavement management system. But unlike fee-based water and sewer services, the City’s repaving budget comes mostly out of the General Fund and competes with other City services. The price tag for needed repaving work is pretty high and the Arvada City Council will be deciding in September and October just how much to allocate for this kind of work.

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
The phone number for the City of Arvada’s Public Works Department is 720-898-7600.  The project engineer is Tim Hoos who can be reached at 720-898-7644 or thoos@arvada.org .

The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Wednesday 27 August 2014

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Sunday Comment Deadline for the Olde Town Parking Structure


by John Kiljan

Dear CLRC members and friends,

The Olde Town station design and its EIS are being revised.

If you want to see a pedestrian bridge over the tracks at the new Olde Town parking garage, or an alternative pedestrian underpass, or if you want to see the 35-minute Ride Provide van shuttle service to DIA from the Olde Town Park & Ride continue after opening day in 2016, or if you want to see taxis, handicap vans, hotel shuttle services and the like have easy access to the station without stopping to let off passengers on Grandview and on other Olde Town streets — now is the time to speak your mind. Currently, none of these features are included in the proposed revisions to the EIS.

The public comment deadline for the revised station design is Sunday, August 24th at midnight, and it is quick and easy to post an online comment that goes to both RTD and to the Federal Transit Authority (FTA) — the agency that is providing much of the funding for the new Olde Town station and has promoted rapid approval for the project as a public-private partnership.

Revised Station Design - click to enlarge

Revised Station Design – click to enlarge

The proposal for the Gold Line commuter rail station has come a long way since the first public informational hearings were held. Originally, there was some consideration of two pedestrian overpasses at each end of the station to solve the problem of having the station’s parking located on the south of the tracks, while train boarding would only be allowed from the north side of the railway tracks.

That ped bridge idea disappeared when the preliminary Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was issued by RTD. The transit agency simply said ped bridges were not needed and a pedestrian underpass was not economically feasible. That meant that commuter-rail passengers and those parking to shop in Olde Town would have to cross the tracks while trains were entering and leaving the Olde Town station.

That created an access and safety issue that remained un-addressed until earlier this year when a private-sector developer proposed building a pedestrian bridge that would both better feed shoppers into the Olde Town businesses from the parking garage while providing a safe crossing opportunity for commuter rail users who will see their platform access cut off just before their train arrives at the platform.

How often and how long will the crossing gates be down? I’ve asked that question more than once. Those who might know aren’t yet saying. In part, I’m told, because it’s uncertain if the gates on both Vance and Olde Wadsworth will have to be down while the trains are approaching or are in the station.

Pedestrian Crossover Bridge Turned Down by RTD

Pedestrian Crossover Bridge Turned Down by RTD

But despite strong support for a pedestrian bridge from both the Arvada City Council, City Staff, the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority, the private developer of the urban renewal area just east of Vance Street, and from most of the public during presentation meetings showing the benefit of an overhead pedestrian crossing and the minimal impacts on the views from Grandview, the idea was recently nixed by RTD. And we are still not sure why.

The reason wasn’t funding. Additional grants were available for the pedestrian bridge. RTD simply said that a pedestrian bridge would have an “adverse impact”. Moreover, they said an alternative pedestrian underpass was unworkable from both a cost and engineering standpoint. At that point one AURA Commissioner quipped, “Wouldn’t getting pedestrians hit by a train be an adverse impact?” Apparently, a pedestrian underpass is feasible both from an engineering and economics standpoint at the next RTD Gold Line station down the line at Arvada Ridge, where it is an integral part of the station’s current design.

With the currently planned 15-minute each-way headways for the commuter rail, that means that the gates that will close both pedestrian and vehicle access will begin dropping every 7-1/2 minutes during peak hours. If, in the future, the original preliminary EIS headway schedule is adopted because of higher demand, then those gates will be dropping every 3 minutes and 15 seconds. With its single-track design, both inbound and outbound commuter rail trains cannot be in the station at the same time.

GOING TO DIA — WHEN DO I NEED TO BE AT THE STATION?
Safe pedestrian crossings and better parking access to Olde Town are not the only issues. The Arvada station will also be transportation hub for the City.

Much of the current RTD Park & Ride patronage is for people going to DIA to travel or to work at the airport. The Gold Line will indeed offer a connecting service to DIA, but it will involve a change at Union Station (with baggage, possibly kids, and an escalator or elevator ride) to another platform on the opposite side of the station to another train that will be operating on an uncoordinated schedule. When that airport train arrives at DIA, it will not be letting off passengers at the terminal. Passengers will have to hoof it a bit to get to the actual airport.

I’ve also asked — and again more than once — what the expected time will be for door-to-door service for the Gold Line to DIA. I have not yet gotten an answer for either peak or off-peak hour trips to the airport. My best estimate is that the maximum time — Arvada platform to check-in — will exceed an hour and a half during off-peak periods. If you have catch a plane, you have to know when you will need to catch the train. As many airport trips have told me, the 35 to 45 minute travel time for the direct Ride Provide van service to DIA is a pretty reliable number. That appears to make continuing the existing Ride Provide A-Line service to DIA a pretty viable operation for many years to come.

However, in addition to cutting off the subsidy that Ride Provide has enjoyed for years for its DIA shuttle service since the A-Line replaced RTD’s long-defunct AA shuttle service, RTD says it does not plan to allow passenger pickup access at the Gold Line station nor at its parking garage for a competing service to DIA. This may mean the end of Arvada’s door-to-door airport shuttle service if it cannot get approval to operate elsewhere in the City. That would be a loss to Arvada and hurt the businesses that use the service for reliable access to DIA. Moreover, moving the A-Line pick-up site away from the Olde Town Park & Ride hurts the viability of the service.

Currently Approved EIS Station Layout Showing Drop-Off Locations

Currently Approved EIS Station Layout Showing Drop-Off Locations

HOW TO COMMENT
It’s pretty simple, really. You just go to this website and fill in the who-from boxes and then the comment box:

http://www.fastracks-comments.com/public/comment.aspx?project=gl

But before you do, you might want to scan through the actual proposal to revise the currently approved EIS. You can read that proposed revision by going to this link:

http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/media/uploads/gl/GL_Olde_Town_Reevaluation_20140730.pdf

And, you can look at an RTD PowerPoint presentation that was shown at a public meeting on August 7th by going to this link:

http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/media/uploads/gl/20140807Olde_Town_Station_Reevaluation_Public_Meeting.pdf

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
You can also go to the RTD website at

http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/gl_179

which has a brief summary of the changes to the original EIS.
The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”. Hey, it’s not us. It’s Facebook that insists on spelling Livable that way.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Saturday 23 August 2014

 

 

 

 

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Arvada Asks for Citizen Advice on Spending $70 Million for Major Projects


by John Kiljan

[updated August 23, 2014]

Dear CLRC members and friends,

Road widening, recreation, parks, urban development, sidewalks, municipal buildings, higher education facilities, public landscaping, traffic signals, bridge replacements, arts and humanities, open space — what’s most important to you? And what projects are most needed by the people who live in Arvada and pay its taxes?

Here’s your chance to volunteer to help the City make those spending decisions, but think twice before you do — there’s a lot of work involved.

1407251599_Banner_CCIPC

 

The City of Arvada is obligated by its Charter to spend 20% of the City sales tax it takes in on capital improvement projects (CIP’s). Typically CIP’s are projects (such as road widenings) that are expected to last ten years or more. But several years ago the City Council redefined the criteria to include projects that may only last for five years (such as roadway overlays). Add to this the monies available to the City after its current debt obligations are paid off, and the amount of money available for these long-lasting projects is expected to top $70 million over the next ten years.

Although that is less than a thousand dollars for each City resident, it’s still a lot of money for a city like Arvada. And that money should be spent wisely. It is the responsibility of the Arvada City Council — and no one else — to prioritize the possible public improvement projects in the CIP list. But that’s a daunting task for any Councilor and that’s why the City Council is now asking for help.

But there is more. The list of capital projects on the City’s wish list for the next ten years far exceeds the available $70 million. There is also a possibility the City may fund even more improvements through lease-buyback arrangements or by issuing straightforward municipal bonds. The City currently has a triple-A bond rating, which means it can borrow money now to build projects that might otherwise have to be put off for decades.

And it can borrow money needed to do that at some pretty low interest rates and without having to increase taxes. This committee may be asked to provide input on those borrowing options as well.

So what projects do you think should come first? This isn’t a fill-out-an-index-card-at-the-end-of-a-one-hour-public-meeting request for input. It involves a lot more.

Instead, participants will be asked to take almost the same amount of time and effort as the City Council members themselves would take to prioritize the list of possible CIP projects now in front of them in their ten-year plan. Participating will take a lot of time and study and showing up for workshops to learn how a city like Arvada works and what’s important to the City’s well being — before even beginning to make recommendations.

Participating will be a lot like going back to school again, except you won’t have to pay tuition and you will probably have the opportunity to debate those who have opposing views on what’s best for Arvada.

The City has formed a CIP committee in the past. The last time was in 2007. I was told that there were 75 applicants at that time. Only 25 volunteers were supposed to be selected the last time, but the interest was strong enough that 33 people were chosen to form a rather large and unwieldy working group. This time only about 21 people are expected to be selected, but their meetings are supposed to be posted as open meetings and their work is to be available for all to review. And public comment periods are expected during their meetings.

If you are interested in contributing your talents and skills to this process, here is the City of Arvada’s official web posting for the volunteer solicitation that has links to the forms needed to apply:

http://arvada.org/about-arvada/seeking-applicants-for-citizens-capital-improvement-plan-committee/

The applications are due by Friday, August 15th, at 5:00 pm.

Update:  The application deadline has been extended to September 5, 2014 at 5:00 pm.  For more information go to

http://arvada.org/about-arvada/seeking-applicants-for-citizens-capital-improvement-plan-committee/

So what does it pay for all this time and effort? Well, if the committee members behave, they will probably get fed while they miss their dinner hours at home. But the real payoff will be in helping see a city operating as efficiently as it can and with as much informed public input into what its funding priorities should be as it can handle. And, if it works anything like the last 2007 CIP advisory group did, I can promise participants they will learn a lot about a how the City of Arvada works.

Central Ralston Road sidewalk

Central Ralston Road sidewalk

Will the proposals made by the committee be adopted by the Council? Not necessarily. The Council may reject the committee’s recommendations in part or entirely. Funding priorities are the Council’s responsibility. The picture here is of a sidewalk segment on Ralston Road that was given a top priority by the last CIP committee. It still hasn’t been upgraded in the six years since that recommendation was made.

But the Council is taking this effort pretty seriously. They also expect to invest a lot of City Staff time in working with the committee’s members. That slows down other City functions. Still, the Council and the City Staff itself seem to think that investment in time and resources will be worth it.

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
In addition to the Arvada.org link shown above, you may follow our online posts.

The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

Our main website is at RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”. Hey, it’s not us. It’s Facebook that insists on spelling Livable that way.

CLRC
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

Wednesday 6 August 2014

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Olde Town Arvada Neighbors Work to Preserve Historic Reno Park


by Kelly Eargle

Hi Neighbors!

There are a few of us who live in Reno Park who have started a grassroots effort to preserve the integrity of our historic neighborhood and the history of the original settlers of Arvada. Sadly, a home in our historic neighborhood has been demolished. This home at 5608 Yarrow was built in 1900. We have heard that the owners are planning to build a single-family home in its place, but it will not be historically sympathetic.

Yarrow Street in the Reno Park District next to Olde Town

Yarrow Street in the Reno Park District next to Olde Town

In an effort to protect our neighborhood and the character of Olde Town Arvada, we are petitioning the city to change the zoning ordinance. Currently, zoning in part of Reno Park Historic District, including all of Yarrow and east Zephyr from Grandview to Ralston, is RM – Residential Multifamily, which is “intended to encourage a wide range of housing types, including apartments, townhomes, and condominiums to meet the diverse needs of the housing market” and allows for convenience stores.

Mixed Use Housing in Tennyson District

Mixed Use Housing in Tennyson District

Our desired is RSL – Residential Small Lot District that is “intended to preserve the size, scale, density and character of single-family residential development in the older, established neighborhoods of Arvada.”

If you would like to help us in our cause, including signing a petition, please contact me at earglek@gmail.com.

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

You can catch us on our main website at RalstonCommunity.org or read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”.

27 July 2014

 

 

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