Park Place Photo Essay – Apartments to Lease this Fall


Park Place Photo Essay – Apartments to Lease this Fall

by John Kiljan

Dear CLRC members and friends,

Curious about the construction going on at the corner of Ralston Road and the Wadsworth Bypass? Arvada’s Olde Town is growing and Park Place is Olde Town’s most recent residential development.

Park Place Olde Town under construction

Park Place Olde Town under construction

It’s hard for the 60,000 or so drivers who pass by the southwest corner of this busy intersection each day to get a good look at what’s being built there. So, in May, I asked the developer of this project if he would let me have a look at the site from the inside so I could put together some photos for all of us to see. The developer quickly agreed, and after waiting a few days for some decent weather, I was given an hour-long hard-hat tour of what turned out to be a very busy construction site.Rendering sw_2

A LITTLE BACKGROUND
Park Place is tucked in between the Wadsworth Bypass and McIlvoy Park on land that was once home to the Masons and the Lions Club before they left their buildings, and on a retail strip that used to host a tire shop and tattoo parlor before the Bypass was rebuilt to allow it to pass under Grandview Avenue.

View from Olde Town Tavern

View from Olde Town Tavern

The site was slated for low-density three-story walk-up apartments with surface parking. But Arvada’s urban renewal authority, AURA, actively encouraged the construction of medium-density apartments on the surplus land by offering part of it at no cost to the developer in exchange for adding a number of improvements.

Morning view of McIlvoy with campus-like feeling

Morning view of McIlvoy with campus-like feeling from sheltered traffic noise

Those improvements included features such as under-the-building parking, elevators, a better architectural design, some off-site improvements and adding more units. There will be a number of special features as well, such as a wifi café, barbeque areas, a small pool on the second level, security features, an area for washing the residents’ dogs, repairing and maintaining their bicycles and tuning their skis.

All of this is in line with urban renewal’s efforts to restore blighted urban lands, and with creating walkable communities with higher density housing for new construction within walking distance of the new Gold Line commuter rail station. The new rail station in Olde Town is expected to be open for passengers around the middle of next year.

Mcllvoy pavilion from the north Park Place Olde Town plaza

Mcllvoy pavilion from the north Park Place Olde Town plaza

In the final design, the Park Place Olde Town will have 153 units on five levels with three plazas looking out over the adjacent McIlvoy Park from its second level. There will also be eight garden-level apartments on the west side next to the park and three more on the south side of the building. All the apartments will be one or two bedroom units. There will be elevators and six handicap-accessible apartments as well. Half the parking will be located under the building. The rest will be in a screened area on the east side of the building. The main entry will be on the southeast corner of the building from Teller Street, where the building is the tallest because of the sloping ground.

The building is not expected to be complete until very early next year, but the property managers will be letting out some of the units as early as this September even while the rest of the building is under construction starting into winter. The property will be let and managed by Lincoln Properties, who also manages the Water Tower apartments on the southwest corner of Olde Town.

View from heart of Olde Town from the Arvada Public Library

View from heart of Olde Town from the Arvada Public Library

So far, there is no estimate for the increased business that the new residents will bring to Olde Town retailers, but the mix of new residents living there should add noticeably to the area’s vitality. And, after AURA’s redevelopment authority runs out in about 16 more years, the County, the schools, the library, fire department, recreation district and county social services should see quite a bump in the property taxes they collect each year as $18 million in improvements are added to the property’s valuation.

There’s more to come in new residences in Olde Town. Solana is expected to break ground at the end of the year on about 350 new apartments just east of the mini-storage on the Wadsworth Bypass. Those housing units should be built to even better condominium-grade standards than Park Place, with up to three bedrooms and individual garages and a full pool for its residents. But that’s a story for another article.

View from the corner of Grandview and Upham

View from the corner of Grandview and Upham

Despite the benefits to the planned growth of Olde Town, the Park Place housing project has been controversial. Many living near Olde Town objected to the more modern architecture of the building, its height and its proximity to McIlvoy Park. Also objected to were the razing of the old Masons’ Hall, even though there were no viable options for repurposing the building.

The photos here are very amateur, and they were taken with a digital hand-held camera. They include pictures taken inside the building and a number of views of what the topped-out building now looks like from various locations in Olde Town. Also included are a few comparison photos of what the architects say the building will look like when it is complete. Also included are some photos put out by opposition groups that greatly exaggerated the visual impact of the new building in an effort to stop its construction.

South façade of the building with entryway below

South façade of the building with entryway below

While I was walking the construction site with one of the developers, Mark Goldberg, he talked about the pride he had in the ongoing work and the benefits he saw it bringing to Olde Town and the City as a whole. And he was especially complimentary about how well he could work with the City Staff and the City Council on planning and building the project.

Below is further information on a temporary website for those to who want to pre-register to lease an apartment when the new units start opening up. A permanent website will be started later on. There are also other links for the architectural design of the building and past CLRC articles on its development.

MORE PHOTOS

View from the park pavilion

View from the park pavilion

Swimming pool under construction in a plaza

Swimming pool under construction in a plaza

What the plaza will look like when completed

What the plaza will look like when completed

Covered parking area under the apartments

Covered parking area under the apartments

Plaza to have wifi café and fire pit

Plaza to have wifi café and fire pit

The same plaza when finished

The same plaza when finished

Looking out over the park from the rec room/café

Looking out over the park from the rec room/café

Looking inward on a plaza with workers taking a lunch break

Looking inward on a plaza with workers taking a lunch break

Another 9 am view of the park adjacent to the garden-level apartments

Another 9 am view of the park adjacent to the garden-level apartments

Interior hallway under construction

Interior hallway under construction

View to the north and the outdoor parking area -- only half the parking will be below the building

View to the north and the outdoor parking area — only half the parking will be below the building

Another view of a plaza from an upper-level apartment

Another view of a plaza from an upper-level apartment

A view from an apartment looking over the Grandview bridge and the Denver skyline

A view from an apartment looking over the Grandview bridge and the Denver skyline

A view from the roof overlooking St Anne's church -- residents will not be allowed onto the roof

A view from the roof overlooking St Anne’s church — residents will not be allowed onto the roof

The view toward Long's Peak from an upper-level apartment

The view toward Long’s Peak from an upper-level apartment

 

Spruce tree preserved during construction

Spruce tree preserved during construction

Trees coming close to touching the apartment windows.

Trees coming close to touching the apartment windows.

View to south to Granview Avenue

View to south to Grandview Avenue

The rooftop is being covered with a thick, white waterproofing membrane

The rooftop is being covered with a thick, white waterproofing membrane

The base of a construction crane and its counterweights

The base of a construction crane and its counterweights

This finish test wall is being used to obtain approval for wall coverings by the City before application

This finish test wall is being used to obtain approval for wall coverings by the City before application

Looking to the north along the west side of the building

Looking to the north along the west side of the building

And now for a few views of Park Place from around Olde Town . . .

Looking north from 56th and the Wads Bypass

Looking north from 56th and the Wads Bypass

View from Teller and Grandview

View from Teller and Grandview

Ceremonial "topping tree" replanted McIlvoy Park

Ceremonial “topping tree” replanted McIlvoy Park

View from the Stocke-Walter side of the Bypass

View from the Stocke-Walter side of the Bypass

View from the Grandview Street bridge

View from the Grandview Street bridge

View from Grandview east of the bridge

View from Grandview east of the bridge

View from Fuzzy's Tacos in Olde Town

View from Fuzzy’s Tacos in Olde Town

What anti-PPOT said the view from Fuzzy's would look like

What an anti-PPOT group said the view from Fuzzy’s would look like

Saint Anne's school children at recess in a noticeably quieter park

Saint Anne’s school children at recess in a noticeably quieter park

View looking north from Grandview Avenue

View looking north from Grandview Avenue

What Arvadans were told this view would look like

What Arvadans were told this view would look like

View from Upham Street and Ralston Road

View from Upham Street and Ralston Road

McIlvoy Park playground

McIlvoy Park playground

View from the back of St Anne's school

View from the back of St Anne’s school

What we were told the view would look like

What we were told the view would look like

View from the far side of Wads Bypass and Ralston Road

View from the far side of Wads Bypass and Ralston Road

WHERE TO FIND OUT MORE
Here are the planned lease rates for the units:

PLAN                                  STARTING FROM
1A 686 Sq Ft                     $1,180
1B 823 Sq Ft                     $1,420
1C 800 Sq Ft                     $1,395
2A 1,130 Sq Ft                  $1,395
2B+ 1,053 Sq Ft               $1,640
2C 1,199 Sq Ft                  $1,720

Seems expensive? To read a Denver Post article on increasing apartment rental rates in the metro area, have a look at this Denver Post article:

http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_28110292/metro-denver-apartment-rents-go-off-leash?source=infinite

There’s another Denver Post article about Park Place Olde Town at

http://www.denverpost.com/arvada/ci_25614072/arvada-oks-18-million-park-place-olde-town/

You can pre-register to get on a list to lease the units as they come open by clicking on this link:

http://www.parkplaceoldetown.com/

To see more detailed architectural plans for the units, go to this website:

http://www.vmwp.com/projects/pdfs/park_place.pdf

For past CLRC articles on the development, try these links:

https://ralstoncommunity.org/2014/04/24/masons-hall-being-pulled-down-photos/

and

https://ralstoncommunity.org/2015/01/20/how-tall-is-five-stories-park-place-olde-town-reaches-to-the-sky/

There’s a YouTube video (if it’s still available) that describes the coming destruction of Olde Town caused by housing like Park Place. It has the exaggerated pictures of the project’s size and was put out by “Save Arvada Now”. Here is the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MILSHPBkChU

And here’s another more recent anti-urban renewal post about Park Place by a related group:

http://www.arvadaforallthepeople.com/2015/05/failing-historic-olde-town-arvada.html

And then there is your own CLRC: The Citizens for a Livable Ralston Community is an independent neighborhood association representing the neighborhoods adjacent to Ralston Road from the Wadsworth Bypass to the Kipling Parkway.

You can read all of our articles on our main website at http://www.RalstonCommunity.org or you can read even more posts on our Facebook page at “CLRC – Citizens for a Liveable Ralston Community”. You can write to us, call us or email us at

CLRC
c/o John Kiljan, Secretary
6185 Field Street
Arvada, CO 80004

303-423-9875
jpkiljan@yahoo.com

June 10, 2015

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Park Place Photo Essay – Apartments to Lease this Fall

  1. Charles Ault says:

    wonderful and clear

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s